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Table 1 Use of electronic alerts for detection of acute kidney injury in clinical studies

From: Impact of electronic-alerting of acute kidney injury: workgroup statements from the 15th ADQI Consensus Conference

Study Number of participants Setting Process of care Outcome
Studies reporting on the use of e-alerts without measurement of process of care or outcome
Colpaert (2007) [6]   ICU   
Thomas (2011) [7] 463 patients 2 hospitals   
Selby (2012) [8] 2619 patients 1 hospital   
Porter (2014) [9] 15,550 patients/22,754 admissions 2 hospitals   
Handler (2014) [10] 249 patients 4 nursing homes   
Wallace (2014) [11] 23,809 Hospital   
Ahmed (2015) [12] 944 ICU   
Studies reporting on the use of e-alerts: no improvement reported
Sellier (2009) [13] 603 Hospital No impact on prescription errors  
Thomas (2015) [14] 308 Hospital   No difference in outcome of AKI
Wilson (2015) [15] 23,664 Hospital   No effect on AKI rate
Studies reporting on the use of e-alerts: improvement reported
Rind (1991) [16] 10,076 patients /13,703 admissions Hospital Adjustment of medication sooner  
Rind (1994) [17] 20,228 admissions Hospital Adjustment of medication sooner Decreased risk for AKI
Chertow (2001) [18] 17,828 patients Hospital More adequate antibiotic prescription  
McCoy (2010) [19] 1237 patients Hospital More adequate medication prescription  
Terrel (2010) [20] 2783 patients visits Emergency room More adequate dosing  
Cho (2012) [21] 463 patients Hospital More contrast prophylaxis Less AKI
Colpaert (2012) [22] 951 patients ICU More and earlier interventions for AKI Less progression AKI
Goldstein (2013) [23] 21,807 patients/27,711 admissions Pediatric hospital   Less AKI
Selby (2013) [24] 8411 patients Hospital   Decreased mortality AKI
Claus (2015) [25] 87 patients ICU Decrease workload pharmacist  
Kolhe (2015) [26] 2297 patients Hospital   Less AKI progression Decreased mortality